On Friday, we had snow, then sleet, then some rain and then into Saturday it became sleet and then back to snow that lasted almost into Sunday morning. The weather forecasters had been tracking this storm for a while. It looked touch and go as to what we would get and how much and when it would start here in eastern Virginia. A manager at one of the places I work sent out one of the best cancelation emails I have ever received: “Due to the impending doom, classes are canceled tomorrow.” She is from upstate New York and has a sense of humor about snow south of the Mason-Dixon. And my work schedule put me at the particular work place just as it started to snow. She ended up canceling classes for the afternoon as well. The snow stuck to the roads pretty quickly.

Today, Sunday, is chilly and beautiful. The wind has calmed and the sky is achingly blue. When I looked up early this morning, I thought “I haven’t seen a sky that color since I was last in New Mexico.” I went out after breakfast to start shoveling the driveway. We have a fairly long and curved driveway. It is uphill all the way to the street and trees line both sides. I have to shovel the whole thing side to side so that we can get traction up the hill to get out, and so that we don’t accidentally slide into a tree or slip into the side of the house trying to traverse its aggregate length on the way back down. I decided last year that I would know when it was time to move when I get too old to shovel it.

I have a system for shoveling. I start at the top and work in angles and use gravity to help. It is the simple kind of geometry I liked back in late elementary and early high school. I still wear the galoshes I got around 6th grade complete with loafers from that time inside. My coat is a nylon jacket I got in 9th grade all those decades ago. They feel like old friends that are there for me every winter. And I wore thermal and wicking shirts I used in winter while I trained for marathons some years ago. Marathons take over your life. I just run for fun these days. It is a nice meditation time. I think I wrote most of my dissertation while running.

I walked up to the road. The only tracks in the snow were birds and squirrels and rabbits. I wondered how the little fox who used to hang out some last summer is doing. Hope he or she is okay. The first thing I noticed as I started shoveling was that the alternation of the types of precipitation resulted in snow on top of a layer of ice. Ice does not shovel very well. Hidden in the snow were lots of branches and small limbs that had come down in the wind yesterday – little barriers that could stop a blade quickly. The combination of snow and ice took me back to the snows of ’66 back home. We missed a lot of school for snow days that year, and a snow fort I built in our front yard stayed there for weeks with its ice armor over the snow walls.

I like shoveling snow. It is a kind of meditation. There is the cold, the stark clarity of the landscape, the clean scent of frozen air. There is the serenity of the quiet. Just birds and squirrels were out except for three times when people and their dogs walked by. Today was interesting. How to push snow while standing on ice. I do a lot of balance work with taijiquan and qigong. I used those principles to stay upright. Relax, sink your energy (qi) down to your center and below. Root your feet to the earth. Let energy come up through your feet and legs, direct it with your waist – silk reel – express the energy with your arms and hands. Keep the posture up, breathe to the diaphragm, move from the lower dantien. Embrace tiger, return to mountain. Flow with Dao in harmony with nature. Hard to stay mindful all the time, though, and that is okay. Memories of past snows, thoughts of internal ongoing conversations and writing projects, the occasional blasts of songs by Adele in time to movement of the shovel. Sometimes the brain was as busy as the arms and legs. If I did start to slide, I would just flow with it and stay upright and in control. Just pretended I was in a pickup hockey game with Denis Leary.

The fitbit says I walked a little over three miles. I could probably go out and do the whole thing again now. The sun has softened up the ice. But it is getting late in the day. The temperature is falling. The sun and its yang power will be back tomorrow to take the yin cold of the ice and turn it to water. Let softness, yielding, and flexibility overcome the hard and rigid – practice wu wei in the aftermath of the storm.